The Tale of Two Slabs Destined to Become an Eating Surface...

Originally posted May 17, 2014 image

This is a tale of two lonely slabs living at Heritage Salvage in Petaluma.  Who wouldn't want to take these two lovely pieces of wood and make them into a dining room table?  It seemed like a really, really good idea to me.

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This is the first, rough sketch for my table top idea.  Loved the idea of the live edge in the center.  Made me think of a fault line, and nature and home...

The clients, who had recently purchased a home that was still living in the Nineties, had asked me to participate in the complete remodel of the home, as well as choose furnishings for the house.  My concept was the beach with an acacia wood floor throughout the living area, and colors of sand, driftwood, the ocean with greyed blues and greens.  Natural materials like soapstone, limestone, quartzite...texture and tone on tone.  So, it seemed fitting to add a custom piece in the dining room that would be immediately viewed upon entering the front door.  And the two pieces of lace wood, which is related to the oak family, seemed absolutely perfect.  The live edge was tame enough to function as a table surface but wild enough to create the look I wanted to achieve.They will be cleaned up, planed and primped to bring out the natural chatoyance of the lace wood and then finally floated upon a metal base.Are you wondering, like me, what "chatoyance" means.  This was a word floated by "Bug", the owner of Heritage Salvage when we picked out the slabs.  I love a good vocabulary lesson while working.Chatoyance is often used in reference to gemstones but this is the definition in relation to wood:

"Chatoyancy can also be used to refer to a similar effect in woodworking, where certain finishes will cause the wood grain to achieve a striking three-dimensional appearance; this can also be called pop-the-grain, wood iridescence, moire, vibrancy, shimmer or glow. This effect is often highly sought after, and is sometimes referred to as "wet look", since wetting wood with water often displays the chatoyancy, albeit only until the wood dries. Oil finishes and shellac can bring out the effect strongly".

Stay tuned for after photos...